The real Jetsons! The futuristic European flying ‘AirCar’, which can transform from a road vehicle into an aircraft in less than three minutes, is being sold to China

By Shivali Best for Mailonline

11:48 Mar 27, 2024, updated 12:42 Mar 27, 2024

From Harry Potter to The Jetsons: flying cars have been a staple of science fiction blockbusters for years.

But they are slowly but surely becoming a reality, with several companies competing to be the first to bring a commercially available vehicle to market.

One such company is KleinVision, the Slovakia-based developer of AirCar – the world’s first certified flying car that can transform from a road vehicle to an aircraft in less than three minutes.

Although the car has already been certified to fly in Slovakia, the technology behind it has now been sold to a Chinese company, which KleinVision says will “accelerate progress towards mass market production of flying cars.”

The news comes shortly after the British government announced that flying taxis will be flying through British airspace by 2028.

Flying cars are slowly but surely becoming a reality, with several companies competing to be the first to launch a commercially available vehicle. One of those companies is KleinVision, the Slovakia-based developer of AirCar

Flying AirCar specifications

Engine: Prototype 1 has a 160 hp fixed propeller engine, but Prototype 2 will be equipped with a 300 hp engine.

Top speed: 300 km/h (186 mph)

Range: 1,000 km (621 miles)

Price: Not yet revealed

AirCar is a dual-mode craft, capable of reaching altitudes of more than 2,000 meters and speeds of more than 160 km/h.

It was certified to fly in Slovakia in 2022 after completing more than 200 takeoffs and landings during 70 hours of rigorous flight testing according to European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) standards.

Now the technology has been sold to Hebei Jianxin Flying Car Technology Company for an undisclosed amount.

This licensing agreement grants the Chinese company exclusive rights to produce and distribute flying cars using KleinVision’s technology within a ‘specific’ – but undisclosed – geographic region.

“This partnership represents an important step in our mission to expand global access to revolutionary mobility solutions and drive advancements in the industry,” said Anton Zajac, co-founder of KleinVision.

Hebei Jianxin Flying Car Technology Company is located in Cangzhou and has already built its own airport and flying school.

AirCar is a dual-mode craft and can reach altitudes of more than 2,000 meters and speeds of more than 160 km/h
It was certified to fly in Slovakia in 2022 after completing more than 200 takeoffs and landings during 70 hours of rigorous flight testing according to European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) standards.

READ MORE: £235,000 flying car can take off at any time to skip the queue – and could go on sale as early as 2025

And the ability to use KleinVision’s technology could help the company leap ahead of its rivals.

According to Morgan Stanley, the global flying car market is expected to reach $1 trillion by 2040, before rising to a whopping $9 trillion by 2050.

China is on track to have a 23 percent market share by 2050, after the US share of 27 percent.

Speaking to Nikkei, Guo Liang, CEO of Chinese flying car developer Aerofucia, claimed that China’s flying car revolution will “surpass the electrification of cars.”

“The full-fledged commercialization of flying cars in China will begin in 2025 or 2026,” Guo said.

While prices for flying cars remain unclear, Guo claims they will soon become more affordable than helicopters.

‘As a new form of low-altitude transport, [flying cars] The rates will initially be one-third or one-fifth of those for helicopters,” Guo said.

“It may be a bit expensive for the average person, but costs will continue to fall.”

While prices for flying cars remain unclear, Guo claims they will soon become more affordable than helicopters

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